Archive for December, 2014

Is there any authentic spirituality?

This is the sister question to “Why are we spiritual if this is only a secular universe?”  We are spiritual AND this is only a secular (nonspiritual) universe.  We evolved a spiritual need.  It is certain and it is certainly with us always.

It’s fulfillment is less certain.  And it has remained uncertain throughout our deep evolutionary time.   That need makes us seek communal religious behavior.   We may ask God for spiritual fulfillment.  We may dance our way to it with trance-inducing drum rhythms.   Ritual is the cut-and-dried approach, the default connection to the spiritual.

At a minimum, ritual is a religious placebo.  We may think it gets us where we want to go–whether it does or not.  In the institution of modern religions, as we sit in the pews, we are under social pressure to behave, to behave AS IF we’ve been spiritually satisfied.  Is it the religious equivalent, though, to seeing that the emperor, who has no new clothes, is naked?

If we do have the need, but most of us don’t achieve spiritual satisfaction, what should be our path?

December 28, 2014 at 5:45 pm Leave a comment


Hello

I write for agnostics, freethinkers, atheists and humanists. In my nonfiction, the purpose is the celebration of our noble human spirit. The general pursuit may be Evolutionary Theology, though believers seem to populate that field (so maybe it's evolutionary Humanism). By looking at who we are and where we came from, we can derive much meaning, and perhaps more importantly, understanding, as well as some sense of where we could go.

Religion is God’s Way of Showing Us it’s Earlier in Human Evolution than We Thought

This title is an upcoming book at the publisher's now. I'd like feedback on this title. It's meant to make people think and feel something. And to hint at things for both believers and non- on multiple levels. The book is of a wider scope, though, one which is ultimately a way to grasp more meaning for ourselves. Believers are always telling us our lives don't have meaning without a god. We often counter that it's more meaningful to be looking for our own meaning than to be arbitrarily ascribed it by an imaginary supernatural being. Ultimately, and this is what I think is unique about this book, you'll see how we can be just as spiritual in our own way. Since we've inhertited a capacity for religion (some more than others) as an evolutionary adaptation, believers and non- are both potentially spritual in the same way--but it is an earthly, secular spirituality in which we all can share.