“Why can’t we all just get along?”?

November 13, 2013 at 10:47 pm Leave a comment

 

Perhaps, this is just the season of our discontent.  Is the atheism movement big enough for all of us?  If Christianity is big enough for all of them, I would think so.  But more to the point, do we, can we, leave the “old atheists” behind?  And the New Atheists, too?  And seek a better destination, in the land of neo-atheists or Atheists+plus where we will reveal only the better angels of our nature?

Feminism feels unwelcome if not rebuffed.  LGBT, under-served. Other issues and constituencies might feel that way, too.  Humanism could take the position that New Atheism is too hard on Christianity.

In the branch of atheism that I’ve suggested as neo-atheists, I suggest that we will make the most progress by interacting with believers, showing them we are people of goodwill, having common-ground discussions with them, perhaps doing joint humanitarian projects.   Nothing new here, but it takes each of us a while to “process” our thoughts and feelings to be ready for such a step.

Many of us were largely cast as the lot we found ourselves to be in by Christians.  Our “godless” natures and other self-applied apellations/epithets can be traced back to our outcast origins. For us, we bought into Christian culture’s role ascribed for us as “bad boys” and the like.

There was, or is, in the zeitgeist the sense that atheists are the demonseed, blasphemers, heretics.  Bastards of our type, the holy books said, should be stoned to death.  It was easier to stay in the closet than face all that.  As we come out, the liberation is heady.  It can make us giddy, even a little immature.

Those that came from a different background–say a nonbelieving family–free from such baggage, are more functional than those of us who were liberated later in life.  Are these the Eloy who would move on?

Humanity is a story of assent, perhaps, even a spiritual story.  To the extent that each of us can incorporate that assent, emulate it, in our lives, we strive for an upward climb.  Can we grow as people?  Yes.  Do we grow?

Entry filed under: atheism, atheist, freethought, Humanism. Tags: , , , , , , , .

What is religion? Who has the right to define spiritual atheism?

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Hello

I write for agnostics, freethinkers, atheists and humanists. In my nonfiction, the purpose is the celebration of our noble human spirit. The general pursuit may be Evolutionary Theology, though believers seem to populate that field (so maybe it's evolutionary Humanism). By looking at who we are and where we came from, we can derive much meaning, and perhaps more importantly, understanding, as well as some sense of where we could go.

Religion is God’s Way of Showing Us it’s Earlier in Human Evolution than We Thought

This title is an upcoming book at the publisher's now. I'd like feedback on this title. It's meant to make people think and feel something. And to hint at things for both believers and non- on multiple levels. The book is of a wider scope, though, one which is ultimately a way to grasp more meaning for ourselves. Believers are always telling us our lives don't have meaning without a god. We often counter that it's more meaningful to be looking for our own meaning than to be arbitrarily ascribed it by an imaginary supernatural being. Ultimately, and this is what I think is unique about this book, you'll see how we can be just as spiritual in our own way. Since we've inhertited a capacity for religion (some more than others) as an evolutionary adaptation, believers and non- are both potentially spritual in the same way--but it is an earthly, secular spirituality in which we all can share.

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