Archive for December, 2010

Enlightened is as enlightened does

Blogger Staks Rosch at Philly Atheist Examiner has it pretty much right, I think, when he offers Paul Kurtz’s urging (for humanism) to present a positive worldview.  Check it out here.

Stacks, the blogger, also touches on the Human Light celebratation.  Especially important, I think, is the exercise that went on at the celebratory luncheon in Philly on the 19th.  Basically, attendees were invited to come up with their wish for the world–then, to say what they could do to make it happen.

Both the wish and the action suggested are very much in keeping with the spirit of this new blog.

Staks also offers in his post a link to a Neil DeGrasse Tyson video that is well worth anyone’s attention.   I sent it to a Christian that’s dear to me as an offering of insight into where I’m coming from.

 

Many of us, godless in the Bible Belt for short, carry a lot of baggage with/for Christianity.  After all it gave us our start or restart, re-birth, renaissance, enlightenment.  I can’t help but reflect on the words of the young Christian that I spoke of elsewhere.  He wanted those around him to be better off because there was a Christian in their midst.

We should at least strive to equal that goal and sentiment.

December 22, 2010 at 1:17 pm Leave a comment

‘Tis the season

I’m torn when I see the atheist billboards that may be offending Christians.  On the one hand, the consciousness of the public needs raised.  They need to know we are here.  Without catching the attention of mainstream society, they forget about us.  And it’s too easy to imagine that they want to forget about us.

On the other hand, if we offend Christians at Christmas time, are we doing ourselves any good?  Granted, it reaches other freethinkers, doubters, brites and it supports and, perhaps, heartens them.

I hope the billboards, bus advertising, and other outdoor media are taken as an invitation to dialogue.   For the most part, they aren’t the most offensive statements that could be devised.  The advertising may have been ordered without concern or care whether anyone on the otherside of the cultural divide is insulted.  Fair enough.

We may be missing the opportunity to forge alliances across the lines.  Not all Christians are radical fundamentalists or evangelists.  I saw an enlightened young man in a short televised interview say that rather than pursue the course of the old guard, he wanted people’s lives to be better because a Christian lived in the neighborhood.  That sounds like the true Christian spirit to me, but not something we’ve heard from those who railed against atheists and humanists in the past.

I suggest we keep that young man’s ideal in mind.

At the same time, I also wonder if we have raised the public consciousness sufficiently?  We’re not like a racial minority.  We’re not openly visible.  And in some ways we’re farther behind the GLBT community in gaining respect.  Granted, our treatment hasn’t been as harsh in recent history.

There are now a few atheists in political office.   Perhaps there’s less job discrimination.  Or is it just easier for us to keep quiet?   The gays have been gaining ground in church–one area where I think we’ll always lag.   The gays have been in the TV sitcoms for years.  I don’t think we’re there yet.

Undoubtedly, Christianity holds sway in the U.S.  (I’m dumbfounded when I hear them say they are such a put-upon minority.)  As some kind of majority, they get their way.  For people of conscience, when they respect us, they’ll care that they haven’t been respecting our feelings and rights.

It seems to me that the question is, how best do we gain respect?    Are we still in the protest phase?  Do we need to march?  Are we in the awareness/consciousness-raising phase?  Or are we ready to dialogue?   It could be all the above depending on our target audience.

We need to maintain a dialogue (which could entail starting one).  I suggest we sidestep their fundies and dialogue with the Christians who want us to be happy they’re here.

December 15, 2010 at 10:28 pm 4 comments


Hello

I write for agnostics, freethinkers, atheists and humanists. In my nonfiction, the purpose is the celebration of our noble human spirit. The general pursuit may be Evolutionary Theology, though believers seem to populate that field (so maybe it's evolutionary Humanism). By looking at who we are and where we came from, we can derive much meaning, and perhaps more importantly, understanding, as well as some sense of where we could go.

Religion is God’s Way of Showing Us it’s Earlier in Human Evolution than We Thought

This title is an upcoming book at the publisher's now. I'd like feedback on this title. It's meant to make people think and feel something. And to hint at things for both believers and non- on multiple levels. The book is of a wider scope, though, one which is ultimately a way to grasp more meaning for ourselves. Believers are always telling us our lives don't have meaning without a god. We often counter that it's more meaningful to be looking for our own meaning than to be arbitrarily ascribed it by an imaginary supernatural being. Ultimately, and this is what I think is unique about this book, you'll see how we can be just as spiritual in our own way. Since we've inhertited a capacity for religion (some more than others) as an evolutionary adaptation, believers and non- are both potentially spritual in the same way--but it is an earthly, secular spirituality in which we all can share.